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Aircraft Products
Written and compiled by Sue Poole

The role of Rohr Aircraft Corporation in the aircraft industry was "primarily that of a manufacturing company, filling the needs of the major airframe companies for the designing, tooling and manufacturing of parts and assemblies" that required specialized skills and equipment (Rohr, 1956, p. 16).

"Rohr produced assemblies include jet engine pods, struts, thrust reversers, stabilizers and elevators, fuselage sections, landing gear doors, cargo doors, as well as numerous smaller components" (Rohr Corporation 1964 Annual Report, p. 4).

In the early 1960s, the aircraft industry and Rohr production lines were "phasing out propeller driven aircraft in favor of the first generation jets" (Rohr Corporation Annual Report 1970 30th Anniversary Year, 1970, p. 6).

By 1965, Rohr's aircraft customers were: The Boeing Company, Douglas Aircraft Company, Lockheed-Georgia Company, Lockheed-California Company, and Grumman Aircraft Engineering Corporation. Rohr manufactured jet engine pods, fuselage sections, stabilizers, elevators, thrust reversers, struts, ailerons, laning gear pods and doors, cargo petal doors, wing-to-body fairings, flight and ground spoilers, and wing joint fittings (Peeples. Summer 1965, p. 54).

During the 1970 fiscal year, the aircraft industry and Rohr were transitioning "from the conventional to the wide-bodied jet transports." Rohr "received $20 million in contracts to provide engine pods and other components for two prototype United States supersonic transports (Rohr Corporation Annual Report 1970 30th Anniversary Year, 1970, p.6).


2-175 light aircraft
Another Rohr project. Most Riverside people do not know that  that some of it was built at Riverside. Burt Raynes wanted to keep it secret from Fred Rohr so he had it built off site. After Westergard test flew it and Rohr found out about it it was destroyed and sent to the Chula vista dump. (Submitted by Jerry Van Hulle, 6/1/2020).
See also:
THE ROHR TWO-l75 (l974) by F. Marc de Piolenc (retrieved 6/3/2020) https://massflow.archivale.com/2_175.htm

1049
Engine:
Plant:
Rohr product:

The 1049 was phased out of production in 1958 (Austin. November-December 1958, p. 17).

Airbus A300 (commercial wide body aircraft products)
Engine:
CF6-80C
Plant:
Rohr product:
nose cowl, fan cowl, core cowl and EBU

Engine: PW4000
Plant:
Rohr product:
nose cowls, fan cowls, nozzles and plugs, EBUs and thrust reversers 

Airbus A310
(Commercial Wide Body Aircraft Products)
Engine:
CF6-80C
Plant:
Rohr product:
nose cowl, fan cowl, core cowl, and the EBU

Engine: PW4000
Plant:
Rohr product:
nose cowl, fan cowl, nozzle and plug, EBU, and thrust reverser

Airbus A319 (Commercial Narrow Body Aircraft Product)
Engine:
Plant:
Arlington
Rohr product: nose cowl, fan cowl, nozzle and plug, EBU, thrust reversers and pylons

Airbus A320 (Commercial Narrow Body Aircraft Product)
Engine:
Plant:
Rohr product:
Rohr produced the nose cowl, fan cowl, nozzle and plug, EBU, thrust reversers and pylons for the CFM56-5 engine at the Toulouse (1970s) and Hamburg plants.

Airbus A321 (Commercial Narrow Body Aircraft Product)
Engine:
Plant:
Rohr product:
Rohr produced the nose cowl, fan cowl, nozzle and plug, EBU, thrust reversers and pylons for the CFM56-5 engine at the Toulouse (1970s) and Hamburg plants.

Airbus A330 (Commercial Wide Body Aircraft Products)
Engine:
Plant:
Rohr product:
Rohr produced the nose cowl, fan cowl, core cowl, and EBU for the CF6-80E engine.

Rohr produced the nozzle and plug for the TRENT 700 engine.
Rohr was also involved on the PW 4168 engine.

Airbus A340 (Commercial Wide Body Aircraft Products)
Engine:
Plant:
Rohr product:
Rohr produced the nose cowl, fan cowl, nozzle and plug, EBU, and thrust reverser for the CFM56-5C2 engine in Toulouse, France during the 1970s.

Anglo-French Concorde
Rohr manufactured components: engine inlets, engine bay enclosures, elevons, and rudder sections

See:

Rohr Corporation. Rohr Corporation, 1968, p. 24.

Boeing 707 series (commercial transport/commercial narrow body aircraft)
Engine: Pratt & Whitney JT 3 and 4 series, turbofan engines
Plant: Auburn
Rohr manufactured components: sound suppressors/thrust reversers, fuselage section 46, wing body fairing, jet engines and pylons, stabilizers and elevators, ailerons, main landing gear doors, and nose wheel doors

Production of the Boeing 707 began in 1957 (Rohr Corporation 1967 Annual Report, p. 7).
By October 1958 Rohr was producing jet engine pods and thrust reversers, wing and tail pylons, fuselage sections, ailerons, and stabilizers and elevators for the Boeing 707.

Rohr’s Auburn, Washington plant produced the aft fuselage section, main landing gear doors, nose wheel doors, horizontal stabilizers and elevators, thrust reversers, jet engine pods, and pylons for the Pratt Whitney engine.
Boeing 707 aft fuselage sections were built at the Rohr Auburn, Washington plant (Greater Riverside Chambers of Commerce, September 1982).

See:

Austin, Edward T., ed. July-August, 1958. “18 - and Still Growing: New Orders and Expanded Facilities Send Year’s Sales to Record Total.” Rohr Magazine 8, no. 11: 3–6.

Austin, Edward T., ed. August 1959. “Plastic Tooling: Familiar Materials Take Strange Shapes in Pattern Shop.” Rohr Magazine 9, no. 4: 16–17.

Rohr Corporation. Rohr Corporation, 1968, p. 15.

Boeing 707 jet airliner series
1958 - Rohr produced power pods and other components (Austin. July-August 1958, p. 3).

         - Rohr constructed the sound suppressor - thrust reverser units for the Boeing 707 Stratoliner series (1958).

Boeing 707 Stratoliner
Rohr manufactured "engine pods and other structural components" for the Boeing 707 (Rohr, 1976). The Boeing 707 Stratoliner began service in 1959 (Rohr, 1956).

See:
Rohr. Annual Report 1956.

Boeing 707-120
"For 707 series of commericial transports, Rohr manufactured jet engine pods and struts, thrust reversers and sounds suppressors, landing gear doors, nose gear doors, aileron assemblies, and a 43-foot fuselage section" (Rohr Corporation 1964 Annual Report, p. 4).

Boeing 707-120


Boeing 707-320 Stratoliner

Boeing 720-B
Engine: turbofan
Plant:
Rohr product:

Boeing 727 (short to medium range commercial transport/commercial narrow body aircraft product)
In the 1960s, Rohr manufactured "engine pods and other structural components" for the Boeing 727 (Rohr, 1976).

Rohr produced the auxiliary power unit shrouding, cargo door straps, thrust reversers and jet engine pods.

See:
Rohr Industries., Inc. Annual Report 1976.

Boeing 727
The Boeing 727 is a a "three-engine commercial transport."

See:
Rohr Corporation 1964 Annual Report, p. 4.
Rohr Corporation 1967 Annual Report, p. 7.

Boeing 727-200
The Boeing 727-200 is 20 feet longer than the basic 72.

See:

Rohr Corporation. Rohr Corporation, 1968, p. 17.

Boeing 727 Trijet
Engine:
Plant:
Rohr manufactured components: engine pods, auxillary power unit shrouding, and cargo door straps

See:

Rohr Corporation. Rohr Corporation, 1968, p. 17.


Boeing 737 (short range/commercial narrow body aircraft product)
Engine: Pratt & Whitney turbofan
Plant:
Rohr manufactured components: jet engine pods, thrust reversers

The Boeing 737 was "a twin engine commercial jet transport designed for shorter route segments and feeder type airlines" (Rohr Corporation 1966 Annual Report, p. 6).
Rohr built the pods and thrust reversers for the small 737 twinjet (Rohr Corporation 1967 Annual Report, p. 7).

Rohr manufactured "engine pods and other structural components" (thrust reversers and jet engine pods) for Boeing’s 737 Pratt Whitney engine (Rohr, 1976).

See:

Rohr Corporation. Rohr Corporation, 1968, p. 22.
Rohr Industries., Inc. Annual Report 1976.

Boeing 737 - 3/4/500 
(Commercial Narrow Body Aircraft Product)
Rohr produced the nose cowl and fan cowl for the CFM56-3 engine at the Arlington, California plant.

Boeing 737 – 700 (Commercial Narrow Body Aircraft Product)
Engine: CFM56-7
Plant:
Rohr manufactured components:

Boeing 747 (commercial transport/commercial wide body aircraft products)
Engine: Pratt & Whitney -
PW4000
Plant: 
Rohr manufactured components: jet engine pods and pylons, thrust reversers

Engine: Pratt & Whitney - PW JT3D
Plant:
Rohr manufactured components: thrust reversers, nacelles

Engine:
Plant: Auburn, Washington
Rohr manufactured components:  powerplant assemblies

Engine:
RB211-524G
Plant: 

Rohr manufactured components: nozzle and plug

Engine: CF8-80C
Plant: 
Rohr manufactured components:
engine pods and other structural components" (nose cowl, fan cowl, and core cowl) (Rohr, 1976).

Engine: 
Plant:  Riverside, Chula Vista
Rohr manufactured components: power plant assemblies and pylons (“Rohr Corporation Annual Report. 1970. 30th Anniversary Year.” 1970, p. 6)

Rohr was to make initial deliveries to Boeing's Everett, Washington plant in March of 1968. The 747 was to begin airline service in the Spring of 1970. (Rohr Corporation 1967 Annual Report, p.

"Fiscal 1970 was the first full year of production on the power plant assemblies and pylons." Fiftyeight shipments were delivered to Boeing from the Rohr Auburn assembly plant (“Rohr Corporation Annual Report. 1970. 30th Anniversary Year.” 1970, p. 6)

"The worlds most spacious airliner" "entered commercial service on January 22, 1970 and carried its millionth passenger less than six months later" (“Rohr Corporation Annual Report. 1970. 30th Anniversary Year.” 1970, p. 7).

"Fifty-eight of the huge powerplant assemblies for the Boeing 747 were delivered during the year from the company's facilities in Auburn, Washington" (“Rohr Corporation Annual Report. 1970. 30th Anniversary Year.” 1970, p. 9).


See:

Rohr Corporation. Rohr Corporation, 1968, p. 11.
“Rohr Corporation Annual Report. 1970. 30th Anniversary Year.” 1970. Rohr Corporation.
Rohr Industries., Inc. Annual Report 1976.

Boeing 757
(Commercial Narrow Body Aircraft Product)
Rohr produced the fan cowl, nozzle and plug, thrust reverse and pylons for the RB211-535 engine.

Rohr also worked on parts for the PW2037 engine.

Boeing 767 (Commercial Wide Body Aircraft Products)
Rohr manufactured the nose cowl, fan cowl, and core cowl for the Boeing 747 CF6-80C engine (Rohr, 1976).

Rohr also produced parts for the PW4000 engine.
Rohr produced the nozzle and plug for the Boeing 747 RB211-524H engine.

Boeing 777 (Commercial Wide Body Aircraft Products)
Rohr produced the nozzle and plug for the GE90 engine.


Rohr also produced parts for the PW4084 and TRENT 800 engines.

Boeing B-50 Superfortress Medium bomber
Engine:
Plant:
Rohr manufactured components: power packages

In 1947 the first large scale production order from Boeing to Rohr was placed  for the manufacture of power packs (the most complicated for Rohr at that time) for the B-50 Superfortress Medium bomber. In early 1948 Boeing ordered from Rohr the aft fuselage section of the B-50, Rohr's "first venture in building a typical airframe section" (Kitchin 1952).

See:
Rohr. Annual Report 1956.

Boeing B-50
(long range, deterrent bomber)
Engine:
Plant: Chula Vista
Rohr manufactured components: power packages
See:
Austin, Edward T., ed. August 1960. “Out of the Celery Fields: A New Concept Creates an Industry.” Rohr Magazine 10, no. 6: 3–9.

Boeing B-52 series Government/Military (basic long range bomber)
Engine: turbofan engines
Plant:
Rohr manufactured components: bomber fuselage sections
Titanium was first used in the production process as early as 1952 in the Boeing B-52 program (
Rohr Corporation. 1968, p. 5).

Boeing B-52H 
Government/Military (missile platform" bomber) 
Engine:
Plant:
Rohr manufactured components: turbofan pods, jet pods, struts, and other components

Boeing B-52H  Government/Military
Engine: J57

Boeing B-52 Stratofortress
See:

Rohr. Annual Report 1956.

Boeing B-52G Stratofortress (long range "deterrent bomber")
Engine: Pratt & Whitney J57-P-43W
Plant: Riverside
Rohr manufactured components: adhesive bonded structural assemblies for the pylons, power pods

The B-52G is capable of operating from relatively short runways at high gross weights (Weston 1958). The "G" has a shorter vertical stabilizer (“New Roles for Versatile B-52.” 1959).
1958 - Rohr produced the power pods and other components for the B-52G (Austin. July-August, 1958, p. 3).

See:
“Adhesive Bonding: New Horizons for Familiar Product.” 1959. Rohr Magazine 9, no. 3: 14–17.

Boeing C-97 Government/Military
Engine:
Plant: Chula Vista; Riverside beginning in 1953
Rohr manufactured components: power packages

The KC-97 was "used as an aerial refueling tanker by the Strategic Air Command and as a military cargo plane under the C-97 designation" (“Packs and Pods: Twenty Years of Aviation History Spell out on Rohr’s Production Line.” August 1960).Rohr bid on and won a contract for the C-97 powerpacks, "the largest single production progam at Rohr" at the time (Kitchin 1952).

Boeing KC-97 Stratotanker (aerial tanker)
Engine:
Plant: Riverside
Rohr manufactured components: power packages

See:

Rohr. Annual Report 1956.

Boeing KC-135
Government/Military
Engine:
Plant:
Rohr manufactured components:

Boeing KC-135 Jet Tanker-Transport 
Government/Military
Engine: J57
Plant: Riverside
Rohr manufactured components: stabilizers
The Boeing KC-135 jet tanker is a military version of the basic Boeing 707 design (“Packs and Pods: Twenty Years of Aviation History Spell out on Rohr’s Production Line.” August 1960).
An aerial tanker, similar to the Boeing 707 Stratojet, the KC-135 replaced the KC-97. Rohr made the Pratt & Whitney jet engines for the KC-135. "The KC-135 is capable of refueling bombers at much greater speeds and altitudes, saving time and fuel (O’Sullivan 1958).

See:
Rohr. Annual Report 1956.

Boeing KC-135 military tanker
Government/Military
The KC-135 program began in 1954 at the Riverside plant." Rohr produced the power pods, stabilizers and elevators. It was scheduled to phase out in October of 1956. (Rohr Corporation 1964 Annual Report, p. 4).

Boeing SST (commercial wide body aircraft products)
Engine: GE
Plant:
Rohr manufactured components: jet engine pods
See:

Rohr Corporation. Rohr Corporation, 1968, p. 19.

Boeing's United States supersonic transport  Government/Military
In May 1967, Rohr was selected to to build the propulsion pods for the United States supersonic transport. The propulsion pods were to be built under the horizontal tail of the 1800 mile per hour airlined, and equipped with variable geometry air inlets to reduce engine noise and insure optimum engine efficiency (Rohr Corporation 1967 Annual Report, p. 5, 6).

British Aerospace BAe 146 (Commercial Narrow Body Aircraft Product)
Engine:
ALF502

British French Concorde (Commercial Narrow Body Aircraft Product)
Engine:
Plant:
Rohr manufactured components: engine inlets, engine bay enclosures, elevons, and rudder sections.

C-87
See:

Rohr Corporation. Rohr Corporation, 1968, p. 4.

Cessna Citation
Rohr designed and manufactured thrust reversers for the Cessna Citation (Rohr, 1976).
For further reading see:
Rohr Industries., Inc. Annual Report 1976.

Chase and Fairfield C-123
(troop carrier)
Engine: 
Plant: 
Rohr manufactured components:

Consolidated Catalina

Consolidated PB2Y3 Coronado
 

Engine: Pratt & Whitney
Plant: Chula Vista
Rohr manufactured components: power packages

The Consolidated PB2Y3 was "a big four-engine Navy flying boat used extensively as a patrol bomber" “Packs and Pods: Twenty Years of Aviation History Spell out on Rohr’s Production Line.” August 1960). "The last PB2Y-2 was completed December 1941 as a XPB2Y-3" (Wagner, 1968, p. 303).

See:
“Out of the Celery Fields: A New Concept Creates an Industry.” 1960. Rohr Magazine 10, no. 6: 3–9.
Austin, Edward T., ed. August 1960. “Packs and Pods: Twenty Years of Aviation History Spell out on Rohr’s Production Line.” Rohr Magazine 10, no. 6: 14–18.

Wagner, Ray. American Combat Planes.
Rohr's Annual Report 1956.

Consolidated PB4Y2 Privateer
Engine: Pratt & Whitney 
Plant:
Rohr manufactured components: power packages
The Navy version of the B-24, the "first XPB4Y-2 Privateer was flown September 20, 1943" (Wagner, 1968, p. 310).

See:
“Out of the Celery Fields: A New Concept Creates an Industry.” 1960. Rohr Magazine 10, no. 6: 3–9.
Austin, Edward T., ed. August 1960. “Packs and Pods: Twenty Years of Aviation History Spell out on Rohr’s Production Line.” Rohr Magazine 10, no. 6: 14–18.
Wagner, Ray. American Combat Planes.

Rohr's Annual Report 1956.

Consolidated RY3
For further reading see:
Rohr. Annual Report 1956.

Consolidated-Vultee B-24 Liberator  Government/Military - World War II bomber
Engine: Pratt & Whitney, piston
Plant:

Rohr manufactured components: power packages

  • Rohr was founded “in 1940 to supply the aircraft industry with components that manufacture of which required specialized skills and facilities, the Company shortly thereafter began the production of power packages for the B-24. This was the first time these units ever had been sub-contracted. With the outbreak of war, demand for the bombers increased and by V-J Day the Company had produced 38,000 units (Austin. July-August, 1958, p. 5).

  • "More B-24 Liberator bombers were used in World War II than any other type of four-engined bomber. Approximately 18,000 of the bombers were built" (“Out of the Celery Fields: A New Concept Creates an Industry.” 1960)..
  • "A B-24 and a Liberator are exactly the same thing" (Reid, Allen, and Gilbert 1999, p. 1).


See: Rohr Annual Report 1956

Convair 240
Engine:
Plant:
Rohr manufactured components: power packages
Convair produced it's first big airline, the 240, in 1947 (“The Convair 880.” 1959).
 

Convair 340
Engine:
Plant
Rohr manufactured components: power packages

See:

Austin, Edward T., ed. 1958. “Spare Parts Keep 'Em Flying.” Rohr Magazine 9, no. 2: 16–18.

Convair 440 Metropolitan
Engine:
Plant
Rohr product:

The 440 was phased out of production in 1958 (Austin.
November- December 1958, p. 17.)

See:

Rohr. Annual Report 1956.

Convair 880 jet airliner (commerical transport)
Engine: General Electric CJ805-3 turbojet
Plant:
Rohr manufactured components: power pod, turbojet pod, pylon

See:
Austin, Edward T., ed. 1958. “18 - and Still Growing: New Orders and Expanded Facilities Send Year’s Sales to Record Total.” Rohr Magazine 8, no. 11: 3–6.

“The Convair 880.” 1959. Rohr Magazine 9, no. 4: 12–15.

Convair B-24 Liberator
Successor to the Consolidated B-24 Liberator.
For further reading see:
Rohr. Annual Report 1956.

Convair B-58 Hustler (medium bomber)
Engine:w
Plant: Chula Vista
Rohr manufactured components: stainless steel sandwich assemblies

The Convair B-58 HUSTLER "bomber flies so fast, aerodynamic heat generated makes conventional "skin" unsuitable (Austin 1958). "The B-58 is a complete strategic bomber reconnaissance weapon system" (
“B-24 B-58: Two Convair Bombers Span Twenty Years of Rohr Contribution to Military Aviation.” 1960).

1958 - Rohr manufactured the brazed stainless steel honeycomb sandwich structure panels for the B-58 Hustler (Austin 1958).
See:
Austin, Edward T., ed. July-August 1958. “18 - and Still Growing: New Orders and Expanded Facilities Send Year’s Sales to Record Total.” Rohr Magazine 8, no. 11: 3–6.


Convair B-58 Mach II bomber
Engine:
Plant: 
Rohr manufactured components: stainless steel honeycomb panels
The Mach II Convair B-58 slowly replaced the Strategic Command's B-47 medium bomber
(“Defense Experts See Need for North American’s B-70.” 1961).

Convair C-131 Samaritan
For further reading see:
Rohr. Annual Report 1956.

Convair Liner
Engine:
Plant:
Rohr product:

Convair PB2Y3 Coronado
Successor to the Consolidated PB2Y3.

For further reading see:
Rohr. Annual Report 1956.

Convair PB4Y2 Privateer
Successor to the Consolidated PB4Y2 Privateer
For further reading see:
Rohr. Annual Report 1956.

Convair RY3
Successor to the Consolidated RY3.
For further reading see: Rohr. Annual Report 1956.

Convair T-29 "Flying Classroom"

CX-HLS Heavy Logistic Transport (supersonic transport)
See also: 
Rohr Corporation 1964 Annual Report http://rohrmemories.20megsfree.com/RC64ar.html

Douglas C-54 Skymaster
For further reading see:
Rohr. Annual Report 1956.

Douglas DC-7
Engine:
Plant:
Rohr manufactured components: power packages

Rohr began making power packages for the DC-7 series in March of 1953. It was the first commercial airliner to fly non-stop between Los Angeles and New York in both directions." "The DC-7 ended commercial service in December, 1953 as the world's fastest piston-powered transport" (Austin. November-December 1958, p. 19). 

The DC-7 was phased out of production in 1958 " (Austin. November-December 1958, p. 17).

Douglas DC-7B

Douglas DC-7C
Engine: EA4 Wright
Plant:
Rohr manufactured components:

The most luxurious DC-7s was the DC-7C "Seven Seas." The DC-7C "Seven Seas" was a larger version of the DC-7 (Austin. November-December 1958, p. 19).


Douglas DC-8 jet transport
Plant:
Rohr manufactured components: bonded long duct, jet engine pods

When the production of the DC-7 series ended it was replaced by the DC-8 jet transport (Austin. November-December 1958, p. 19).

Douglas DC-8 Super 62
(stretch version)

Engine: turbofan
Plant:
Rohr manufactured components: jet engine pods, thrust reversers

In 1965, Rohr received contracts for the manufacture of jet engine pods for models 62 and 63. "The Super 62 stretch versio of the DC-8 made its debut in the summer of 1966" (
Rohr Corporation.  1968, p. 16). The first deliveries of model 62 were scheduled for Spring 1967. (Peeples. Summer 1965, p. 54). Rohr built engine pods were "a major factor in the greater range of the Super 62" (Rohr Corporation 1966 Annual Report, p. 6). The Series 60 "are enlarged by by extending the fuselage" (Peeples. Summer 1965, p. 55).

Douglas DC-8 Super 63

Rohr manufactured components: jet engine pods
In 1965, Rohr received contracts for the manufacture of jet engine pods for models 62 and 63 (Peeples. Summer 1965, p. 54). The Super 63 is a stretched DC-8 with additional passenger capacity and operating economies (Rohr Corporation 1967 Annual Report, p. 7). The Series 60 "are enlarged by by extending the fuselage" (Peeples. Summer 1965, p. 55). The Super 63 made its maiden flight in April of 1967 (
Rohr Corporation. 1968, p. 16).

Douglas DC-8 Super 63CF
The Douglas DC-8 Super 63 is the cargo version of the DC-8 Super 63 (
Rohr Corporation. 1968, p. 16).

Douglas DC-9 short range jet transport
See:
Rohr Corporation 1967 Annual Report, p. 7.

Douglas DC-9 (commercial narrow body aircraft product)
Engine:
Plant: Riverside
Rohr manufactured components: jet engine pods, thrust reversers

  • Rohr manufactured "jet engine pods and thrust reversers for the DC-9, two-engine, short-to-medium range commercial transport." In 1964 the "production design of the DC-9 power pod" was completed and the development test program for the thrust reverser," also designed by Rohr, was initiated (Rohr Corporation 1964 Annual Report, p. 4, 5).
  • Rohr Riverside produced the bonded honeycomb control panel (Rohr Corporate 1966 Annual Report, p. 7).

See:
Rohr Corporation. Rohr Corporation, 1968, p. 13.

Douglas DC-9 series 10

Douglas DC-9 series 20

Douglas DC-9 series 30 (extended fuselage version)

Douglas DC-9 series 40 (elongated fuselage)

Douglas Super 60 series
The Douglas "Super-Sixties" series DC-8s were "a larger, faster version of the this highly successful aircraft" (Rohr Corporation 1966 Annual Report, p. 6). Rohr built the pods and thrust reversers (Rohr Corporation 1967 Annual Report, p. 7).


European A-300
Rohr manufactured "engine pods and other structural components" for the European A-300 (Rohr, 1976).
For further reading see:

Rohr Industries., Inc. Annual Report 1976.

F-108 Mach 3 interceptor

Fairchild C-123 Avitruc
For further reading see:
Rohr. Annual Report 1956.

French Government SE-2010
Engine:
Plant:
Rohr manufactured components: power packages

For further reading see:

Rohr. Annual Report 1956.

Fokker 100 (Commercial Narrow Body Aircraft Product)
Rohr worked on parts for the RR TAY engine.

General Electric/Atomic Energy Commission atomic reactor
See also:
“Stockholders Meet: Pension Amendment Gets Approval.” 1958.

Grumman E2A Hawkeye Government/Military

  • Grumman E2A Hawkeye was an "early warning and intercept control airplane used by the Navy." The Winder plant built the aft fuselage and empennage components (Rohr Corporate 1966 Annual Report, p. 7).
  • Rohr manufactured the tail sections, including electrical controls. Assembly work was performed at the Winder, Georgia plant. (Rohr Corporation 1964 Annual Report, p. 4).

 

Grumman F-14 Tomcat fighter Government/Military
- 1970s, Riverside
(Goodrich, 2004)

Grumman Gulfstream (executive transport) Corporate
Engine:
Plant:
Winder, Georgia 
Rohr manufactured components: upper and lower nacelles, baggage doors, escape hatch, nose wheel doors, main landing gear doors and trunnion doors, thrust reversers
See:
Rohr Corporation 1964 Annual Report, p. 4. 
Rohr, 1976

 

Grumman Gulfstream II twinjet (high performance) corporate/executive aircraft
Engine: Rolls Royce turbofan
Plant:
Rohr manufactured components: jet engine pods, pylons, thrust reversers, escape hatch, and nose wheel doors

The Grumman Gulfstream II "was designed as the world's fastest corporate transport with transcontinental range." Rohr-designed thrust reversers will enable the Gulstream II to land in smaller airfields (Rohr Corporation 1966 Annual Report, p. 6). In 1970, Rohr delivered 54 pods (Rohr Corporation 197 Annual Report, p. 9)

See also:

Rohr Industries., Inc. Annual Report 1976.

Rohr Corporation 1966 Annual Report

Rohr Corporate 1967 Annual Report, p. 7.

Rohr Corporation. Rohr Corporation, 1968, p. 20.


Grumman E2A
Rohr products: major assemblies

See:
Peeples, Larry I., ed. 1965. “Orbiting Target: Rohr-Built Sphere Serves to Calibrate Antenna Systems.” Rohr Magazine 15, no. 2: 52.

Grumman Gulfstream F-14
Rohr manufactured "engine pods and other structural components" for the Grumman Gulfstream F-14 (Rohr, 1976).
For further reading see:

Rohr Industries., Inc. Annual Report 1976.

LB-30
The LB-30 was the original prototype of the B-24 (Austin. “Packs and Pods: Twenty Years of Aviation History Spell out on Rohr’s Production Line.” August 1960).
See:
Austin, Edward T., ed. August 1960. “Packs and Pods: Twenty Years of Aviation History Spell out on Rohr’s Production Line.” Rohr Magazine 10, no. 6: 14–18.

Lockheed 649

Lockheed-Georgia Company C-5 military transport aircraft Government/Military
Engine: General Electric high thrust turbofan
Plant
Rohr manufactured components: jet engine pods and pylons, inlet cowl
Lockheed has designated the C-5 as the future version of the L-500 (
Rohr Corporation. 1968, p. 12, 33).

See:
Rohr Corporation. Rohr Corporation, 1968.
The San Diego Union Tribune March 26, 1994
.

Lockheed C-5 (logistics transport)
Engine
Plant
Rohr manufactured components:
pods,

Lockheed C-5 (L-500) Government/Military


Lockheed C-5A (heavy logistics transport) Government/Military

Production of the nacelle and plyon design were to be carried out at the Chula Vista, Riverside and Winder, Georgia plants. It was to be used for transporting personnel and material, including Army inventory, over long ocean routes at jet speed (Rohr Corporation 1966 Annual Report, p. 5). The C-5A military airlifter, developed for the Airforce, was to be the largest aicraft ever flown and was to take to the air in June of 1968. Rohr was to produced the first pylons to Lockheed's Marietta, Georgia plant in December 1967 and the first engine pods in January 1968 (Rohr Corporation 1967 Annual Report, p. 5, 6).

Lockheed C-5A
Aircraft with passenger and cargo capacity and economic advantage "considerd giant steps forward in air transportation" (Rohr Corporation 1966 Annual Report, p. 2).
See:
Rohr Corporate 1966 Annual Report, p. 7.

Lockheed C-49 (military transport)
Engine: 
Plant:
Rohr manufactured components: power packages

Lockheed C-130
Engine: Allison T56 series
Plant:
Rohr manufactured components: engine pods and other structural components

See:
Rohr Industries., Inc. Annual Report 1976.

Lockheed C-130 propjet logistics transport
Engine:
Plant:
Rohr manufactured components:
power plant assemblies

The oldest of of military production programs - on Rohr assembly lines since 1954 was the
See:
Rohr Corporation 1967 Annual Report, p. 7.
Rohr Corporation 1970 Annual Report, p. 9.

Lockheed-Georgia Company C-130 Hercules military transport Government/Military
Engine: propjet
Plant: Winder
Rohr manufactured components: power packages, wing formers

  • The "global workbird for the U.S. Air Force, U.S. Navy, U.S. Marine Corps, U.S. Coast Guard, Royal Canadian Air Force, Royal Australian Air Force, and the Republic of Indonesia Air Force." "Rohr manufactured the power pods and aft nose landing gear doors." (Rohr Corporation 1964 Annual Report, p. 4).
  • Rohr produced the aft nacelles, power packages and wing formers for the T56-A-14 Allison engine at the Winder, Georgia plant.

See:
Rohr Corporate 1966 Annual Report, p. 7.

Rohr Corporation. Rohr Corporation, 1968, p. 14.

Lockheed C-130B Hercules (troop carrier)
Engine:
Plant: Winder
Rohr manufactured components: pods, propjet power packs

Lockheed C-141 StarLifter program (military logistics transport/military cargo transport) Government/Military
Engine:
Plant: Riverside
Rohr manufactured components: exhaust nozzle assembly, j
et engine pods, fairing, thrust reverser doors, 30-foot "petal" or cargo doors, steel honeycomb jet engine exhaust nozzles

Early production of the C-141 began in 1963 (Rohr Corporate 1964 Annual Report, p. 4).

See:
Rohr Corporate 1966 Annual Report, p. 7.

Lockheed Constellation
Engine:
Plant:
Rohr manufactured components:

The Lockheed XB-30 lead to the Constellation transport (Wagner, 1968, p. 137).

See:
Wagner, Ray. American Combat Planes.
Rohr's Annual Report 1956.

Lockheed Electra (commercial transport)
Engine: Allison 501-D13 propjet
Plant: Chula Vista
Rohr manufactured components: power pods, propjet power packs

1957 - The Lockheed Electra began service in 1957. (Rohr, 1956).
August 1958 - The Civil Aeronautics Administration (C.A.A.) certified the "new prop-jet Electra as the first jet age four engine airliner of American design" five weeks ahead of schedule (“Commercial Backlog Still Growing: Increased $18,035,100 in August to $245,300,200.” 1958).


See:
Austin, Edward T., ed. July-August 1958. “18 - and Still Growing: New Orders and Expanded Facilities Send Year’s Sales to Record Total.” Rohr Magazine 8, no. 11: 3–6.
Austin, Edward T., ed. July-August 1958. “Electra Deliveries Near: EAL to Get Planes in September.” Rohr Magazine 8, no. 11.

Rohr. Annual Report 1956.

Lockheed Electra 188
Engine: Allison projets
Plant:
Rohr manufactured components: tailpipe shroud, turbojet pods

See:
“Plastic Tooling: Familiar Materials Take Strange Shapes in Pattern Shop.” 1959. Rohr Magazine 9, no. 4: 16–17.


Lockheed Hudson bomber
Engine
Plant: Chula Vista
Rohr manufactured components: cowl panels

In 1940, when Rohr Aircraft was newly formed it was producing small parts, including the cowling for the Lockheed Hudson bomber (Austin. Summer 1965, p. 6)

See:
Austin, Edward T., ed. 1960. “Out of the Celery Fields: A New Concept Creates an Industry.” Rohr Magazine 10, no. 6: 3–9.

Lockheed JetStar (designed both as an executive aircraft and as a high speed military transport)
Engine: four Pratt & Whitney
JT12A-8 turbojet
Plant: Chula Vista, Winder
Rohr manufactured components: thrust reversers, turbojet pods,
jet engine pods, tailpipes, and landing gear doors; siamese twin pods

The Lockheed JetStar was originally introduced as a miliary plan (
Rohr Corporation. 1968, p. 23). "Preliminary planning for the JetStar started soon after August, 1956" due to a request from the Air Force "for a larger jet utility jet capable of carrying eith to ten passengers" but also wanted to be able to purchase the planes on an "off the shelf" basis. The first JetStar flew in September, 1957 and was turned over to the Air Force for evaluation" in early 1958 (“Vest Pocket Airliner.” 1959).


See:

Rohr Corporation. Rohr Corporation, 1968, p. 23.

Rohr Industries., Inc. Annual Report 1976.

Lockheed L300
Commercial version of the C-141 (Rohr Corporate 1966 Annual Report, p. 7).

Lockheed L300B
Commercial version of the C-141 with an extended fuselage. (Rohr Corporate 1964 Annual Report, p. 4).

Lockheed P2V series Government/Military
Engine: Wright R-3350-32W radial
Plant:
Rohr manufactured components: power packages
As of 1964, Rohr was producing the spare power package assemblies (Rohr Corporate 1964 Annual Report, p. 5).

Lockheed P2V-7 
Engine: Wright
Plant:
Rohr manufactured components: 
The final Neptune version was the P2V-7 (Model 726) subsequently known as the P-2H (Wagner, 1968, p. 313).


See:

Wagner, Ray. American Combat Planes.
Rohr. Annual Report 1956.

Lockheed P-2V Neptune (patrol bomber)
Engine:
Plant:
Rohr manufactured components: piston engine power packages

The P2V Neptune, is built by Lockheed, and "is one of two long range radar patrol ships operated by the ComNavAirPac." (O’Sullivan 1958b). Rohr started building the piston engine power packs for the Neptune in 1951 (“Follow-on Business Is Bread-And-Butter Work for Rohr.” 1960). .


Lockheed P-3

Rohr manufactured "engine pods and other structural components" for the Lockheed P3 (Rohr, 1976).
See:

Rohr Industries., Inc. Annual Report 1976.

Lockheed P3 series anti-submarine aircraft 
Engine:
Plant:
Rohr manufactured components:
propjet power plant assemblies

See:
Rohr Corporation 1967 Annual Report, p. 7.



Lockheed P-3 Orion Government/Military
Engine: T56-A-14 Allison
Plant:
Rohr manufactured components: power packages,
aft nacelles, landing gear doors, tailpipes, tailpipe covers, shrouds

The Lockheed P-3 Orion is "an anti-submarine patrol craft" (Goodrich, 2004).

See:
Rohr Corporation. Rohr Corporation, 1968, p. 21.

Lockheed P-38

Lockheed P3A (anti-marine patrol airplane) Government/Military
The P3A is the successor to the P2V series. As of Rohr produced the "power pods, nacelles, tail pipes and covers, shrouds, and landing gear doors" (Rohr Corporate 1964 Annual Report, p. 5).

Lockheed P3-A Orion
Engine: turbo-prop
Plant: Chula Vista
Rohr manufactured components: propjet power packs

Lockheed P3B Orion Government/Military
"An anti-submarine patrol plane employed by the Navy." Rohr built the propjet engine power plant assembly. (Rohr Corporate 1966 Annual Report, p. 7).

Lockheed P3V Orion Government/Military

Lockheed P3V-1 anti-submarine plane
The Lockheed P3V-1 is the Navy version of the Electra

Lockheed Super-Constellation

Engine:
Plant:
Rohr manufactured components: power packages

See:

Rohr. Annual Report 1956.

Lockheed Super-Constellation Long Range R7V

Engine:
Plant:
Rohr manufactured components:

Rohr manufactures the power packages for the Lockheed Super Consellation Long Range R7V (O’Sullivan 1958b).


McDonnell Douglas DC-8 Series 10, 30 & 40 (Commercial Narrow Body Aircraft Product)

Engine: turbo fan
Plant:
Rohr manufactured components:
nacelles, thrust reversers and jet engine pods


1960s - "the first civilian jet to make a supersonic flight" (Goodrich, 2004)

McDonnell Douglas DC-9 (
twin engine)
Engine:
Plant:
Rohr manufactured components:

McDonnell Douglas DC-9 Series 62 & 63 (Commercial Narrow Body Aircraft Product)
Rohr manufactured jet "engine pods and other structural components" (pylons) for the McDonnell Douglas DC-9 (Rohr, 1976).
See also:

Rohr Industries., Inc. Annual Report 1976.

McDonnell Douglas DC-10 (commercial wide body aircraft products)
Engine: General Electric CF6-6 fanjet
Plant:
Rohr manufactured components: jet engine pods (nose cowl, forward fan wrap cowl, fan nozzle, and core engine cowl), fan cowl, and plug
(Rohr, 1976)

The McDonnell Douglas DC-10 was the "first of the wide-bodied tri-jets, was rolled out July 23, 1970 and made it's inaugural flight 37 days later" (“Rohr Corporation Annual Report. 1970. 30th Anniversary Year.” 1970. Rohr Corporation, p. 6). The first power plant assemblies" "were delivered on schedule in March" of 1970 (“Rohr Corporation Annual Report. 1970. 30th Anniversary Year.” 1970. Rohr Corporation, p. 8, 9).

See:
Rohr Corporation. Rohr Corporation, 1968, p. 18.
“Rohr Corporation Annual Report. 1970. 30th Anniversary Year.” 1970. Rohr Corporation.
Rohr Industries, Inc. Annual Report 1976.

McDonnell Douglas MD-11 (Commercial Wide Body Aircraft Products)
Rohr produced the nose cowl, fan cowl, core cowl, EBU and pylon for the CF6-80C2 engine.

Rohr also produced the nose cowl, fan cowl, nozzle and plug, EBU, thrust reverser, and pylon for the PW4000 engine.

McDonnell Douglas MD-80/-87 (Commercial Narrow Body Aircraft Product)
Rohr produced the nose cowl, fan cowl, EBU, thrust reversers and pylons for the JT8D-209/-217 engine.

McDonnell Douglas MD-90 (Commercial Narrow Body Aircraft Product)
Rohr produced the nose cowl, fan cowl, EBU, thrust reversers and pylons for the V2500 engine.

McDonnell F-4B attack aircraft Government/Military
Rohr Riverside produced the bonded honeycomb trailing edge wing panels (Rohr Corporate 1966 Annual Report, p. 7).

McDonnell's F4H Phantom
Engine:
Plant:
Rohr manufactured components: brazed stainless steel honeycomb panels
See:
(Rohr Corporation 1962 Annual Report, p. 15).

McDonnell's F4H-1
1958 - Rohr manufactured the brazed stainless steel honeycomb sandwich panels for the F4H-1 (“Highlights from Annual Report 1958.” 1958).

McDonnell F4H II Phantom
Engine:
Plant: 
Rohr manufactured components: stainless steel honeycomb panels

The McDonnell F4H-II Phantom is one of the Navy's supersonic fighter-interceptors. (“Jet Age Department Store: If We Don’t Have It We’ll Build It.” 1960).

Navy F-14 supersoni air superiority fighter  (Government/Military)
Engine:
Plant:
Rohr manufactured components: engine inlets and aft nacelles
Contractor: Grumman Aerospace Corporation

  • Rohr produced a canted frame, which was "milled in one piece from an 1,800 pound forging to a finished weight of 222 pounds" (Rohr Corporation Annual Report 1970 30th Anniversary Year, 1970, p. 9).

See:
“Rohr Corporation Annual Report. 1970. 30th Anniversary Year.” 1970. Rohr Corporation, p. 6, 9.
The San Diego Union Tribune March 26, 1994

Navy's P2V-5 patrol bombers

Plant: 

Navy's P2V-6 patrol bombers

Plant: 

Navy's P2V-7 patrol bombers

Plant: 

North American Aviation F-100F fighter-bomber prototype  Government/Military
Engine:
Plant
Rohr manufactured components: thrust reverser

North American Aviation Mach III B-70 bomber
Engine:
Plant
Rohr manufactured components: stainless honeycomb components

North American RS-70
Rohr produced the brazed stainless steel honeycomb panels for the North American RS-70 (Rohr Corporation 1962 Annual Report, p. 15).

North American Sabreliner Corporate
Rohr manufactured components: thrust reverser
In April 1967, North American Aviation announced that Rohr would design and build thrust reversers for the Sabreline executive jet. Flight simulations began in September of 1967.  
(Rohr Corporate 1967 Annual Report, p. 7). Sound suppression and thrust reverser performance testing was "carried out in a remote area, not far from the Mexican border, southeast of Chula Vista, California, where Rohr has established an advance propulsion research test station" (
Rohr Corporation. Rohr Corporation, 1968, p. 34)

PB4Y
A modified four engine bomber (
Rohr Corporation. 1968, p. 4).

Pratt & Whitney F-100 Jet Engine
"Structural components of the titanium honeycomb material produced by the patented RohrBond process" were used on the Pratt & Whitney F-100 Jet Engine (Rohr, 1976).
For further reading see:
Rohr Industries, Inc. Annual Report 1976.

Rockwell International Sabreliner

Rohr designed and manufactured thrust reversers for the Rockwell International Sabreliner (Rohr, 1976).
For further reading see:
Rohr Industries., Inc. Annual Report 1976.

Strategic Air Command B-70 chemical bomber/Valkyrie (Air Force)
Engine:
Plant:
Rohr manufactured components: brazed stainless steel honeycomb structures

Strategic Air Command Hound Dog air to surface missile
Engine:
Plant:
Rohr manufactured components: pylon components, adhesively bonded structural components

The Hound Dog, which can carry a nuclear warhead in addition to conventional bombs with an extended range, "can be launched from the B-52 and B-47 bombers." The Department of Defense described the Hound Dog "as an aerially-launched weapon to carry a nuclear warhead many hundreds of miles beyond the bombers turn-around point, far out of reach of the enemy's defensive weapons" (“SAC’s Shooting Eye.” 1959; Weston 1958).

1958 - Rohr Riverside contracted to "manufacture the prototype support pylons" for the missile "to be made by North American Aviation, and to be carried beneath the wing of the B-52G" jet Stratofortress
(Weston. July-August 1958. p. 17–18).

Strategic Air Command B-47 (medium bombers)
The Strategic Air Command B-47, medium bombers, were replaced slowly by the Mach II Convair B-58 (
“Defense Experts See Need for North American’s B-70.” 1961).

U.S. Air Force's C-5B transport Government/Military
- built at the Foley plant (Johnson, 1985)

 

 

PARTS, PROCESSES and DEFINITIONS:

Aft - tail end (Reid, Allen, and Gilbert 1999, p. 76)

Aft fuselage sections
Ailerons

Autoclaves
1958 -  Rohr Riverside (Austin 1958).

Brazed stainless steel honeycomb sandwich structure panels
1958 - New product manufactured by Rohr, "designed into the new hypersonic airplanes," "supplied for the Convair B-58 Hustler" (Austin 1958).

cargo petal doors

cleco - "A cleclo is a small object used to hold metal parts together in a jig until riveting or spot welding makes the connection permanent" (ROHR Magazine, July-August, 1959, page 2).

dural - "being short for duralumin, the light, strong aluminum alloy used in aircraft construction" ( (Reid, Allen, and Gilbert 1999, p. 89)

elevators

Epoxy
"Epoxy is a thermo-setting plastic that, with the addition of a chemical catalyst, hardens unalterably into the desired shape" (King 1958).

flight and ground spoilers
flap tracks

fore - nose end  (Reid, Allen, and Gilbert 1999, p. 76)

fuselage sections 
horizontal stabilizers

Honeycomb sandwich structure panels
- Manufactured of heat resistant stainless steel by Rohr (Austin 1958).

industrial tape

Jet engine pod - a "sleek metal capsule that covers the engine" and includes 5,000 wires, tubes and other precision parts (
Rohr Corporation. 1968, p. 44).


Jet pod  
The term "power package" was changed to jet pod," "because although the function of the jet engine is the same as the piston engine - to propel the airplane - the configuration of the jet package more closely resembles a "pod." (Austin. July-August 1958, p. 6).


landing gear pods & doors 
nacelles
main landing gear doors

Materiel - "the aggregate of euipment and supplies used by an organization" (Braham 1998).

power pods



"Power package"
A term introduced to the industry by Rohr. A power package is the bare engine built around "the necessary engine mount, sheet metal cowling, panels, diaphragms, supporting structures, air ducts, fuel and oil lines, electrical harnesses, and other items necessary to its operation" (Rohr, 1956, p. 16).

A power package, as applied to a piston driven engine, includes the bare engine, furnished to Rohr either by the customer or the government, and around which the Company builds and installs the engine mount and all supporting structure, the diaphragm, various air ducts, fuel and oil lines, electrical harness assemblies, sheet metal cowling and other items necessary for the engine's operations. When completed and shipped to the customer, this "power package" is ready for use and usually can be attached to the wing of the airplane for which it is built within an hour" (Austin. July-August 1958, p. 6).

A power package "is a term used to describe the propulsion unit on the wings of an airplane propelled by a reciprocating, or piston, engine." In building a power package the bare engine is attached to "the necessary engine mount, sheet metal cowling, panels, diaphragms, supporting structures, air ducts, fuel and oil lines, and electrical harness" (
Austin. Summer 1965, p. 2).

See also: jet pod

For further reading see:

Rohr Aircraft Corporation, Annual Report 1956.

Rohr Tilting Arc
Fred H. Rohr developed and patented the Rohr Tilting Arc, a device that would provide "a better and safer way of handling engines" (Stell 1952).

pylons

SoniForm - "a technique for forming electro-hydraulic shockwave" (
Rohr Corporation. 1968, p. 31).


Sound suppressor/thrust reverser (SS/TR)
See also:
Austin, Edward T., ed. January-Februrary 1958. “SS-TR - - - Rohr Meets Jet Age Challenge.” Rohr Magazine 9, no. 3: 5–8.


spot weld

Stainless steel honeycomb
Plants: Riverside, Chula Vista
See:
Austin, Edward T., ed. July-August 1958. “18 - and Still Growing: New Orders and Expanded Facilities Send Year’s Sales to Record Total.” Rohr Magazine 8, no. 11: 3–6.
“Another Rohr First: New Dimensions for Stainless Steel Honeycomb.” 1959. Rohr Magazine 9, no. 3: 18–19.
“Electric Blanket Brazing: New Process for Stainless Steel Honeycomb Panels.” 1959. Rohr Magazine 9, no. 5: 3–5.

stabilizers
stringer

struts
tail pipes

Welding techniques:
1. "Heliarc, or inert gas, welding is performed chiefly with argon gas at an arc temperature of around 11,000 degrees" (
Austin. November-December 1958, p. 14-15).

2. "Electrode welding is a process in which coated electrodes are liquidified at 2,600 to 2,900 degrees F. and aluminum electrodes at 1,150 to 1,250 degrees to form the weld"
(Austin. November-December 1958, p. 14-15).

3. "Oxyacetylene, or gas welding is done manually at a flame temperature of about 5,800 degrees and may be performed with or without pressure or filler material" (Austin. November-December 1958, p. 14-15).

4. "Brazing, which produces a weld by distributing non-ferrous filler metal between closely fitted surfaces of a joint by capillary action is performed at lower temperatures than ordinary gas welding"
(Austin. November-December 1958, p. 14-15).


Wing chords

wing joint fittings

wing-to-body fairings
See:
“Plastic Tooling: Familiar Materials Take Strange Shapes in Pattern Shop.” 1959. Rohr Magazine 9, no. 4: 16–17.

 

 

REFERENCES:

1958. Rohr Magazine 9, no. 2: 2.

 
Austin, Edward T., ed. August 1960. “B-24 B-58: Two Convair Bombers Span Twenty Years of Rohr Contribution to Military Aviation.” Rohr Magazine 10, no. 6: 10–11.
 
Austin, Edward T., ed. August 1960. “Jet Age Department Store: If We Don’t Have It We’ll Build It.” Rohr Magazine 10, no. 6: 19–23.
 
Austin, Edward T., ed. August 1960. “Out of the Celery Fields: A New Concept Creates an Industry.” Rohr Magazine 10, no. 6: 3–9.
 
Austin, Edward T., ed. August 1960. “Packs and Pods: Twenty Years of Aviation History Spell out on Rohr’s Production Line.” Rohr Magazine 10, no. 6: 14–18.
 
Austin, Edward T., ed. January-Februrary 1958. “SS-TR - - - Rohr Meets Jet Age Challenge.” Rohr Magazine 9, no. 3: 5–8.
 
Austin, Edward T., ed. January-February 1958. “Stockholders Meet: Pension Amendment Gets Approval.” Rohr Magazine 9, no. 3: 3.
 
Austin, Edward T., ed. July-August 1958. “18 - and Still Growing: New Orders and Expanded Facilities Send Year’s Sales to Record Total.” Rohr Magazine 8, no. 11: 3–6.

Austin, Edward T., ed. July-August 1958. “Electra Deliveries Near: EAL to Get Planes in September.” Rohr Magazine 8, no. 11.

Austin, Edward T., ed. July-August 1958. “. . . Of Packages, Pods.” Rohr Magazine 8, no. 11: 6.

Austin, Edward T., ed. July-August 1959. “SAC’s Shooting Eye.” Rohr Magazine 9, no. 6: 14–15.

Austin, Edward T., ed. July-August 1959. “Vest Pocket Airliner.” Rohr Magazine 9, no. 6: 4–6.

Austin, Edward T., ed. March-April 1959. “Plastic Tooling: Familiar Materials Take Strange Shapes in Pattern Shop.” Rohr Magazine 9, no. 4: 16–17.

Austin, Edward T., ed. March-April 1959. “The Convair 880.” Rohr Magazine 9, no. 4: 12–15.

Austin, Edward T., ed. May-June 1959. “Electric Blanket Brazing: New Process for Stainless Steel Honeycomb Panels.” Rohr Magazine 9, no. 5: 3–5.

Austin, Edward T., ed. May-June 1958. “Industry Keeps Eye on Washington Scene.” Rohr Magazine 9, no. 2: 9.

Austin, Edward T., ed. September-October 1958. “Commercial Backlog Still Growing: Increased $18,035,100 in August to $245,300,200.” Rohr Magazine 9, no. 1: 3.

Austin, Edward T., ed. September-October 1960. “Follow-on Business Is Bread-And-Butter Work for Rohr.” Rohr Magazine 11, no. 1: 6.

Austin, Edward T., ed. September-October 1961. “Defense Experts See Need for North American’s B-70.” Rohr Magazine 11, no. 1: 3–5.

Austin, Edward T., ed. Summer 1965. Rohr Magazine 15, no. 2.

Austin, Edward T., ed. November-December 1958. “End of an Era at Douglas: DC-7 Series Phases Out.” Rohr Magazine 9, no. 2: 19.

Austin, Edward T., ed. November-December 1958. “Highlights from Annual Report 1958.” Rohr Magazine 9, no. 2: 3–4.

Austin, Edward T., ed. November-December 1958. “Industry Keeps Eye on Washington Scene.” Rohr Magazine 9, no. 2: 9.

Austin, Edward T., ed. November-December 1958. “Spare Parts Keep 'Em Flying.” Rohr Magazine 9, no. 2: 16–18.
 
Austin, Edward T., ed. November-December 1958. “Weldments Answer Many Production Problems: Expensive Machining Reduced.” Rohr Magazine 9, no. 2: 14–15.

Braham, Carol G. 1998. Random House Webster’s School & Office Dictionary. New York: Random House.

Kitchin, A. F. February 1952. What We Do for Boeing: Quality of Rohr Aircraft Power Packs Brings New Orders for New Products. Edited by Edward T. Austin. The AeROHRcrafter 2, no. 9: 3–4.

King, Joyce. 1958. “Turning the Table on Cost: Epoxy May Be Goop to Some but It Means Savings to Rohr.” Rohr Magazine 8, no. 11: 19.

O’Sullivan, Daniel M. July-August 1958. “12th Air Division at March Air Force Base Symbolizes Massive SAC Retaliatory Power.” Rohr Magazine 8, no. 11: 7–11.

O’Sullivan, Daniel M. September-October 1958. “ComVacAirPac: Island-Based Radar Aircraft Patrol Pacific Backed by Potent Attack Carrier Forces.” Rohr Magazine 9, no. 1: 5–9.

Reid, Constance, Clara Marie Allen, and Sandra M Gilbert. 1999. Slacks and Calluses: Our Summer in a Bomber Factory. Washington, D.C.: Smithsonian Institution.

“Rohr Corporation Annual Report. 1970. 30th Anniversary Year.” 1970. Rohr Corporation.

Rohr Corporation. Rohr Corporation, 1968.

Stell, George. Tilting Arc Solves Problem: Rohr Invention Is Boon to Aircraft Industry. Edited by Edward T. Austin. The AeROHRcrafter 2, no. 9: 5, 12.

Weston, Sam. July-August 1958. “B-52G Punch Extended: ‘Hound Dog’ Guided Missiles Added to Armament of Longer Range Heavy Bomber.” Rohr Magazine 8, no. 11: 17–18.

 

 

 

 

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Last updated: 11-25-2021